08.03.16: Anbaric: Renewable Electricity Transmission Using High-Voltage Direct Current Technology

Article originally appears in CleanTechnica, 08.03.16

In an era of producing multiple forms of renewable electricity, the transmission of this high-voltage energy is becoming increasingly important.

Anbaric often uses high-voltage direct current (HVDC) technology, heralded as one of the “advanced transmission technologies” in the 2005 Energy Policy Act, which provided for the development of a stronger energy infrastructure.

HVDC systems have been in use commercially worldwide since 1954, when the island of Gotland was connected to mainland Sweden via a 60-mile cable. Since then, more than 25 systems have been installed globally. Most often they are used in marine applications where the distance for AC installation is too great. Other times they are used in parallel with AC systems where they provide additional operating control for the system operator.

HVDC systems provide many advantages for installation and construction and can contribute greatly to reliable and flexible operation of an electrical grid. These include:

  • Higher efficiency in moving large amounts of power over long distances
  • Very high reliability with 98.5% availability
  • Full controllability when needed to react quickly to changes in AC frequency
  • System oscillations can be controlled independent of AC system variations or in response to AC system conditions
  • Improving the stability of AC systems, including increasing the stability of parallel AC lines
  • Overload capabilities and controllability that can be beneficial to overall system operations and reliability
  • Ability to provide reactive power control and support of AC voltage, frequency control, limitation of short-circuit current, and transmission at reduced voltage
  • Greatly reduced vulnerability to adverse weather conditions — such as hurricanes, tornadoes, or ice storms — for submarine and buried cable

Anbaric CEO Edward Krapels spent the first 30 years of his career as an energy consultant to governments and companies for Energy Security Analysis, Inc., a company he founded with Sarah Emerson. In 2000, Mr. Krapels left ESAI and founded Anbaric to participate in the development of electric transmission projects…(Read More)